Dear Omar

Yes, Cannabis Will Grow in an AeroGarden Device

I mean, that’s what we heard… from other people. Not because we did it. (Ahem.)

Omar L. Gallaga
Debugger
Published in
7 min readApr 16, 2021

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Photo Illustration: Save As / Medium; Source: Getty Images

Welcome to Dear Omar, a weekly Debugger column from tech expert Omar L. Gallaga. If you have questions for Omar, send them to debugger@medium.com with the subject line “Dear Omar.”

There was a kind of boredom that happened during the pandemic shutdown in 2020 that we may never feel again. It felt like you couldn’t go anywhere or do anything that didn’t involve puttering around your home like a 70-year-old. Knitting was suddenly hot. Home improvement projects abounded. Gardening was suddenly something a lot of us began to dig as a new hobby. We became more comfortable with puns.

It may have happened that during this extended period of new-hobby adoption and exploration of The Old Ways that one might have purchased a gadget called an AeroGarden to grow veggies and herbs. AeroGardens, which can grow plants out of Keurig-like seed pods with only water and liquid nutrients, were hard to find last year as the pandemic increased demand. They were coveted by people like me who wanted to learn how to garden and grow edible crops, but were also really bad at growing plants with soil and sunshine and water.

Once the AeroGarden arrived and proved bountiful in its ability to grow green things, it might have led one to wander over to Google late one night and type, completely out of curiosity and with no intent of action, “AeroGarden can it grow marijuana?”

Not me, of course. I live in Texas, where cannabis is still very, very illegal. It would be foolish even to type such a thing into a search engine because what a waste of time that would be! Ha ha ha! Can you imagine?

But let’s say you had just purchased an AeroGarden, you had access to the internet and its many gray virtual alleyways, and you didn’t live in Texas. How would that even work? You know, for someone who could do it legally. Not me…

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Omar L. Gallaga
Debugger

Tech culture writer and podcaster, now freelancing in Texas. Bylines: Washington Post, WSJ, CNN, NPR, Wired, Texas Monthly. Here for all your wordy needs.